British Couple Pay £67,000 For Two Clones of Their Dead Dog

A couple from the UK have paid a South Korean lab to clone their dog, ending up with two duplicates of the deceased canine. Richard Remde and Laura Jacques of West Yorkshire paid South Korean firm Sooam Biotech Research Foundation  £67,000 to clone their boxer Dylan, who died of a brain tumour at the age of eight, according to The Guardian.

After the couple provided DNA samples of Dylan to Sooam back in July, two clones of the dog were born to surrogate mothers just after Christmas, subsequently named Shadow and Chance by Remde and Jacques. The puppies have made history, being cloned two weeks after Dylan had died; previously, the record for cloning a dog was five days following death.

“The whole thing just feels surreal,” Jacques said. “I lost all sense of time. I have no idea how long everything took, the whole thing made me feel very disoriented. I was just clinging on to Richard for about an hour and a half after Chance was born.”

“After they got him out I still couldn’t quite believe it had happened. But once he started making noises I knew it was real. Even as a puppy of just a few minutes old I can’t believe how much he looks like Dylan. All the colourings and patterns on his body are in exactly the same places as Dylan had them,” she added. “I had had Dylan since he was a puppy. I mothered him so much, he was my baby, my child, my entire world.”

Sooam are considered experts at canine DNA cloning, having used its duplication methods – implanting DNA into dog ova from which the nucleus of the cell has been removed – to create over 700 dogs. While animal cloning is banned in Europe, the practice is permitted in South Korea.

PlayStation 4 Gets New Hack That Allows Users to Install Pirated Games

As security measures and tech advances, so do methods to take them down or work around them. This is the case for a new hack recently discovered for Sony’s PlayStation 4 consoles, which allows users to install pirated games on their consoles.

Reports say that the hack might be coming from a Russian Website that Brazilian retailers use to install games on customers’ PS4 consoles, charging between $100 and $150 for 10 games and $15 for extra games, should they choose to get more than 10.

Sony was faces with a similar hack for its PS3 consoles, but the method used on the PS4 appears to be different. Unlike the PS3 hack which required users to have a modified firmware to allow installation and play of pirated content, the PS4 version seems to use some sort of NAN/BIOS cloning that will keep Sony scans from shutting you down.

The war on piracy has been raging on for ages now, but there’s still a long way to go before it will end (if ever). However, though it has been mentioned before, it is useless to use a lot of funds to try to take down piracy methods due to the fact that other ones will just crop up in their place again. Nevertheless, Sony will not turn a blind eye to this hack and will eventually find a way to plug it as it did with the PS3.

Thank you Sci-Tech Today for providing us with this information

Inateck FD2002 HDD Docking and Cloning Station Review

Introduction


Top slot-loading hard disk docking stations have been around for some time, and once in a while they come with increased functionality over just being a docking station. These days we need the fastest transfer speeds possible with the ever growing user-base that facilitates solid state drives. At the same time, it has to stay as easy and compatible as it always has been. Inateck created the FD2002 Dual HDD Docking station with off-line cloning feature, that is a device that should give us everything mentioned above.

The Inateck FD2002 comes with SATA 3.0 ports connects through a USB 3.0 connection for maximum transfer speeds. USB 3.0 is in its basic version only gives real-world speeds up to around 250 to 300MB/s at the best of times, that is until UASP came into play. UASP stands for USB Attached SCSI Protocol and is designed to address the failings of the classic USB BOT drivers by adding command-queuing and out-of-order completions, among other things. With the use of the UASP, we can archive raw speeds up to and around 450-500MB/s, a thing that just isn’t possible without.

Where most manufacturers would have stopped here and had the users rely on software options, Inateck took it one step further and added a copy and clone function to the docking station. And best of all, it doesn’t even need to be connected to the PC to this function to work.

The clone function is for pure offline-mode usage as a USB connection will interrupt the process. If you wish to be able to have it connected at the same time, Inateck has another model that supports connected duplication. It however requires more internal hardware and Inateck have thought about that and is giving you the choice to get just the right item for you.

The FD2002 supports both 2.5 and 3.5 inch drives. Small drives plug in right through the opening while bigger 3.5-inch drives will push the lever aside when inserted. Plug and play as it should be. The docking station also supports hot-swap and no drivers are needed besides your systems normal USB drivers. The tool-less design makes it both easy and fast to switch drives.

The LED indicator on the top displays the progress of a running duplication process as well as drive activity and connection. There is only one button to use for the clone function, but it requires a bit more than a touch to activate. A good things, as we wouldn’t want to start a duplication by error.

Security is another thing we all like and we want to keep our drives safe from physical damage. The Inateck FD2002 comes with overvoltage, leak currents, short circuits, peak voltage, interference and disturbance protection to guarantee safer data transfer and access.

The unit is listed as compatible with Windows XP, Vista, 7 and 8, Mac OS and Linux, but it should work with any USB capable device.

The Inateck FD2002 comes with both a USB 3.0 cable and a 12V 3A power brick for steady power to even the most power-hungry of drives.

SanDisk Unveils New SanDisk Ultra II Solid State Drive

SanDisk Corporation announced the new SanDisk Ultra II Solid State Drive with enhanced SSD Dashboard. The new drive is designed to deliver a cost-effective and easy upgrade solution for PC owners looking to improve performance, battery life, and power efficiency. The enhanced SSD Dashboard provides visibility into the drive’s performance, security, and available firmware updates, to maintain peak performance at all times.

“We live in an era where we expect to have information at our fingertips any time, anywhere, with technology that keeps us connected to both our personal and work lives on devices that won’t fail,” said Dinesh Bahal, vice president of retail product marketing at SanDisk. “The new SanDisk Ultra II SSD, together with the improved SSD Dashboard, provides consumers with an easy, affordable way to ensure that their PC can keep pace with their increasingly connected, information-driven lifestyle.”

The drive promises up to 28 times the perfomance and up to 15 percent longer battery life compared to a 2½” 7200 RPM HDD. It featurs sequential read speeds of up to 550 MB/s and write speeds of up to 500 MB/s and is based on the X3 NAND Flash technology and comes equipped with nCache 2.0 technology. nCache utilizes a two-tiered caching architecture to optimize drive speed and endurance. The drive is also shock resistant, which keeps data safe even if the computer is bumped or dropped.

[youtube width=”800″ height=”600″]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6sYEQZ0HWp0[/youtube]

The SanDisk SSD Dashboard comes with 17 different languages to choose from and will displays the drive’s performance, allow for manual or scheduled TRIM, update firmware when available and get tips on how to maintain the drive at its peak operation. It also has support features to get assistance from “Live Chat” and “Ask a Question via Email”. The Sandisk SSD Dashboard has the added value of an included Drive-cloning tool that works in 3 easy steps, Antivirus based on Trend Micro Titanium Antivirus and has theft recovery powered by Absolute LoJack.

“Consumers upgrading their PC for a faster experience with the SanDisk Ultra II SSD want the data migration process to be easy,” said Mike McCandless, vice president of sales and marketing, Apricorn, Inc. “We’re excited to partner with SanDisk to provide the Apricorn EZ Gig cloning software to SanDisk customers for simple data migration from slower hard disk drives. EZ Gig is available either through the new SanDisk SSD Dashboard software suite or within the SanDisk SSD Conversion kit and works with all SanDisk client SSDs.”

The SanDisk Ultra II SSD comes with a 3-year warranty and a rated endurance of 1.75 million hours. It will be available worldwide by Sandisk’s network of authorized distributors and resellers in September. It will be offered in capacities of 120GB (MSRP $79.99), 240GB (MSRP $114.99), 480GB (MSRP $219.99), and 960GB (MSRP $429.99).

Birds Key To Bringing Dinosaurs Back To Life?

Birds could be the key to bringing dinosaurs back to life, but do we really want that?

Alsion Woolard, a Biochemist at the Oxford University believes that the DNA from modern birds could be used to design genomes to bring back to life the creatures that last walked the Earth about 65 million years ago. Although this idea isn’t new, with the plot of the Jurassic Park movies closely following this theory. In the movies the DNA of dinosaurs was extracted from blood taken from mosquito’s which were trapped and preserved in amber for over 65 million years.

A similar attempt of the Theory made by Dr Wollard was made by scientists in Australia recently however this resulted in failure. Although Dr Wollard still holds hope for this project saying;

“We know birds are the direct descendants of dinosaurs. Could we ‘rewind’ evolution by switching these genes back on? The difficulty was in finding surviving dinosaur DNA, then making a full genome from millions of short fragments in order. In other words we’d need to de-evolve birds to make a full genome closer to that of dinosaurs”.

Just like the debate with cloning, this latest foray into bringing dinosaurs back to life has a lot of scientists debating the ethics around the de-extinction of not just dinosaurs but other animals as well. I for one remember what happened in Jurassic Park movies and I’m not sure I’d like the happening any time soon. What do you think of this new leap into dinosaur cloning and genetics, think it’s a good thing? Only time will tell.

Thank you The Sydney Morning Herald for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of ScreenCrush.