Toshiba Unveils Budget-Friendly ‘Click’ Laptop

The tablet and laptop hybrid design, made famous by the Microsoft Surface, is becoming more widely adopted as shown by the iPad Pro. Usually, these devices incur a rather hefty cost and out of the reach of most consumers. However, the Toshiba Satellite Click 10 is solely focused on the lower-end segment and retails for $349.99. In terms of its specification, the Click 10 features an Intel Atom x5 Z8300 processor, 2GB RAM, 10.1-inch 1920×1200 multi-touch display and choice between 32GB or 64GB of SSD storage. Furthermore, the maximum storage can be increased via an integrated MicroSD slot.

Toshiba also managed to include a Micro HDMI port, Dolby Digital Plus stereo speakers, front 8-megapixel camera and rear 2-megapixel rear cameras. While it’s not the most powerful device out there, the Click 10 is beautifully designed due to a 2.2 pound weight with the clip-on keyboard. Once removed, the weight reduces to 1.2 pounds and has a 9mm thick frame. This makes it extremely portable and more than capable of performing basic tasks on-the-move.

There are a number of other solid features such as Bluetooth 4.1, 802.11a/g/n Wi-Fi, and an optional external DVD drive. Overall, the lower price point allows more consumers to give the form factor a try to upgrade to flagship models in the near future.

CHERRY Create New Silent Mechanical MX Key Switches

Mechanical keyboards are pretty much the way to go for gamers that want the best possible precision and accuracy, but along comes the loud clicking that isn’t to everyone’s liking. Granted, not all mechanical switches are equally loud, but they make a lot more noise than let us say membrane keyboards.

CHERRY has now created a new mechanical switch that doesn’t produce as much noise and fittingly named it the CHERRY MX SILENT switch. It will be available as a black and a red version to begin with, but the rest of the line-up will get a silent treatment in the near future.

The new silent switches use a patented noise reduction technology with integrated 2-component tappets and audible clicks are reduced to the acoustic minimum. The entire switch is an in-house development and doesn’t feature any third party components. Instead, CHERRY integrated a proprietary and innovative solution through which every single switch retains its special characteristics.

The new silent switches still retain the RGB compatibility of the non-silent models and can be used with high-quality SMD LEDs, just like the previous models. The transparent casing will scatter the light over the surface and create an absolutely uniform illumination with all possible 16.7 million colours.

As previously mentioned, there will be a red and black version at first as they are the most popular of the switches that feature a linear actuator. The force required to trigger the switches is 45 grams for the red and 60 grams for the black. The bounce time remains the same at one millisecond just like the other MX switches.

If you’re in the market for a new keyboard and want it to have these new CHERRY MX SILENT switches, then you’ll have to take a closer look at the upcoming Corsair versions. For the first six months, these new switches will be exclusive to Corsair and they are launching new products with them during Gamescom 2015 in Cologne. Later on other companies can get their hand of these switches too.

 

League of Legends Player Reaches Diamond Tier with Exactly 3,439,140 Mouse Clicks

The Diamond tier isn’t the highest level in the League of Legends title’s ranked mode, but it still is near the top and very hard to achieve. Players who want to climb up the ladder all the way to Diamond (at least) are said to put a lot of effort and time into the game, like three years and around three million clicks, according to a player’s statistic.

League of Legends and redditer r3as0n has reached the Diamond V level, the lowest of the top five tiers that Riot uses to separate each of the seven separate ranks.

Diamond is said to be the third rank, falling short behind Master and Challenger, making it a respectable level to achieve, even with the game’s big community. The redditer has even kept track of the total number of times he clicked the mouse in-game during rank mode and until reaching the Diamond rank.

“I use a Razor Naga MMO mouse for league of legends because i’m not a big fan of shift clicking + Ctrl clicking,” the ranked League player told Kotaku in an email this morning. “I like having the extra 12 buttons at my disposal for key-bindings.”

“I’m reluctant to say that the mouse is the MVP,” he added, “but i’ve had this mouse since 2010 and I’ve never had any issues with it.”

After the last successful qualifying match that placed r3as0n in Diamond V rank, the counter indicated a number of 3,439,140 mouse clicks. This statistic is not just numbers, it also shows how long players are required to play the game in order to just scratch the surface of the upper-most competitive high ranks.

The redditer also admits that he formed a lot of reflexes during his time spent in-game, helping him make quick-judgement and take swift actions during battles.

In the end, given the statistics captured by r3as0n and the high number of League of Legends players, we will probably not see a lot of Master or Challenger ranked characters in the title.

Thank you Kotaku for providing us with this information

Apple’s New Macbook Trackpad Does Not ‘Click’

Everyone knows that the MacBook’s left and right bottom corner, just like on any other laptop trackpad, are physical buttons which the user can press and get the desired click. However, they seem to be missing from Apple’s latest MacBook.

The new MacBook seems to have a unique trackpad which does not ‘move’ at all. When a user ‘clicks’ it, the click is not actually a physical click, but it does generate a click sound and feels just like a normal click. A force feedback, also known as haptic, feature is providing the user with an effect similar to a normal physical click.

It is said that the tech relies on late force fields (LFF), which can cause humans to experience vibrations as haptic ‘textures’ that gives you the impression of a clickable surface and depth. The Force Touch feature of the new trackpad is said to increase its effect based on the depth of a users press.

There are no known differences between the traditional and this more modern type of ‘click’. However, people with carpal tunnel syndrome can benefit from the LFF technology. Apple is said to be looking into integrating the LFF into future iPhones as well.

Thank you TechCrunch for providing us with this information

Click-Bait Links Being Cleaned up by Facebook

Facebook has just announced their plans to clean out our news feeds of click-bait articles and headlines – alongside stories that contain links shared in the captions of photos or within status updates. This follows Facebook’s clean up of like-bait, repeated content and spam links from 4 months ago.

Click-bait is a link attached to a headline which will peak your interest without informing you much about the subject. For example, they’re often using phrases such as “click here to find out!” or “you’ll never guess what happens next!” and things of the like.

Facebook’s official release let on a little bit of insight into why this change is taking place:

“Posts like these tend to get a lot of clicks, which means that these posts get shown to more people, and get shown higher up in News Feed. However, when we asked people in an initial survey what type of content they preferred to see in their News Feeds, 80% of the time people preferred headlines that helped them decide if they wanted to read the full article before they had to click through. Over time, stories with “click-bait” headlines can drown out content from friends and Pages that people really care about.” 

Click-bait articles are becoming quite popular in our news feeds – but often for the wrong reasons. This release shows that the Facebook ‘population’ would prefer articles from reputable companies which actually tell you what to expect in the written content.

Currently, Facebook’s news feed takes into account the length of stay on certain content and the click-through rate of these said articles or websites alongside the interaction data – meaning likes, comments and shares. Using this data, they claim that articles which are clicked on, then with an extended time spent viewing this content in turn means it was worth looking at. This does not take into account the issue of you opening multiple tabs at once, or opening something and taking a break from your computer – so we’re eager to see how this is dealt with.

Facebook is also restricting stories with links in the status or in the text caption accompanying a photo. This may become a concern for many legitimate companies trying to push their products with a where to buy link, or possibly event charity organisations attempting to link to donation portals. The release also stated their intentions for this maneuver:

“We’ve found that people often prefer to click on links that are displayed in the link format (which appears when you paste a link while drafting a post), rather than links that are buried in photo captions. The link format shows some additional information associated with the link, such as the beginning of the article, which makes it easier for someone to decide if they want to click through. This format also makes it easier for someone to click through on mobile devices, which have a smaller screen.”

Cover image courtesy of The Sunday Mail

Inset image courtesy of Facebook Newsroom

Facebook Scammers Exploit Robin Williams’ Death

Not too long ago, we reported on the tragic and unfortunate death by suicide of actor and comedian Robin Williams.

Some people have now decided to utilize this tragedy for their own personal gain. You may have seen a ‘video link’ (as above) on your news feed recently, either though posts from certain Facebook pages or it being shared directly from your friends – do not click!

Once clicked, a webpage will open which forces you to share the link on your own timeline then complete a survey, after which it claims this video will be available to you. When the survey is completed, there is no light at the end of the tunnel, no Robin Williams video displayed and you’ve only managed to do one thing – give these guys ad revenue.

Unfortunately, this is another case of “social engineering” which basically means manipulating people into clicking malicious links. Quite often you’ll see things like “Doctors hate him!”, “You’ll never know what happens next!” or even “Click here for this one secret!” – quite often the titles are too good to be true.

So how do you spot out  a malicious advertisement in your news feed? We understand that it’s not always easy. As we said before, usually the information is too good to be true. If it’s shared directly by a Facebook friend it might be worth you sending them a quick message just to ask the legitimacy of their shared link – quite often they might not even be aware of whats going on.

So far this scam has over 24 million shares on Facebook and is growing.

Security expert and blogger Graham Cluley shares similar thoughts on this news:

“The scammers have no qualms about exploiting the death of a famous actor and comedian to earn their cash, and give no thought whatsoever to the distressed family he must have left behind”

Have you seen a rise in this type of marketing scam recently? How do you combat the issue personally?

Image courtesy of Yahoo