New 3D Display Scraps Glasses, Uses Tiny Spherical Lenses Instead

The most common method of creating a 3D illusion is said to be based on autostereoscopic display, which uses parallax. The method involves presenting each eye with a slightly different angle of a scene with the help of microlenses that project a small amount of light.

While this method has a lot of pros and is used in commercial products such as the Nintendo 3DS, the narrow viewing angle it produces presents a challenge to larger displays.

However, researchers at the Chengdu Technological University and Sichuan University are said to have corrected the issue by replacing the microlenses with microsphere lenses. A prototype based on this technology has been built, which demonstrates that the large curvature of spherical lenses increases the viewing angle from 20-30º to 32º and a theoretical viewing angle of up to 90º.

“The greatest significance is that we propose a cheap and simple way to fabricate a lens array which can bring a wider viewing angle,” said lead author Guo-Jiao Lv at Chengdu Technological University.

Another disadvantage in microsphere lenses is crosstalk, meaning when light from the right and left channels leak into each other. The problem has been resolved by concentrating light from each lens into a small area, but at the expense brightness and overall optical efficiency which the scientists claim to be able to solve in the near future.

Thank you Phys.org for providing us with this information

Nvidia Researcher Discovers a Way to Quadruple Future VR Headset Resolution

A researcher from NVIDIA has apparently discovered a new manufacturing technique which could quadruple the perceived resolution of virtual reality gear in the future. The technique in question is called ‘display cascading’ and uses cascade displays (of course).

Nvidia is said to already have produced a prototype of a headset using the above mentioned technique. A report from MIT is said that the new technique improves the perceived resolution of virtual reality displays. Senior director of research in visual computing at NVIDIA, David Luebke, is said to be the man behind the new technology. He has been stated to use a cascaded display system made up of two modified ‘off-the-shelf’ liquid crystal display panels.

A layer of tiny shutters (one per pixel) which can block off or allow light through, called the spatial light modulation panel, is said to be removed from one LCD and placed over a second panel, offset from its own. This method is said to split each pixels into four individually addressed areas, thus quadrupling the effective resolution at a cost of a decrease in brightness.

Luebke states that along with some driver optimizations, a cascade display should provide both improved resolution and a double perceived framerate, achievable by having both panels run in perfect synchronization. Also, the NVIDIA researcher stated he will unveil the manufacturing technique at a conference in August. For those interested, the research is currently available over at NVIDIA’s website.

Thank you Bit-Tech for providing us with this information

Smartphone AMOLED Panels Said to be Cheaper than LCD in Two Years

LCD panels have been previously used in smartphones and are still being used in most smartphones today. However, the newest display technology on the market is the AMOLED panel, used in smartphones such as the Samsung Galaxy S5 or Note 3, providing improved image quality, but at a much higher price than the LCD panels.

Manufacturers still use the LCD panels in order to bring smartphones at a much cheaper price, having the AMOLED panel’s price at 10-20% higher than the LCD. In an example, it is said that a 5-inch 1080 x 1920 pixels AMOLED panel is said to be 16% more expensive than the LCD counterpart. The good news is that as time passes, new technology becomes more demanding and prices drop. This is said to be the case for the AMOLED panel as well, having said that it will even out or be even cheaper than a LCD panel within two years.

“Until recently there have been few breakthroughs in the production of AMOLED displays, and the OLED industry seemed to be facing hard times,” said DisplaySearch’s Jimmy Kim. “If AMOLED costs fall below LCDs, as expected, it would lead to more opportunities for the OLED display industry, greater competition with LCD, and more choices for consumers.”

It is said that AMOLED production has recently started in China as well as Korea, with expectations for higher demand in the near future. Also, Korean manufacturer, Samsung, is said to have made significant achievements with its Quad HD 1440 x 2560 pixels screen by improving its grayscale and color accuracy, along with its brightness.

Thank you Phonearena for providing us with this information

EIZO Anounces the 6mm Ultra-Slim Frame 23.8″ FORIS FS2434 Gaming Monitor

EIZO has just announced its latest addition to its gaming monitor series, the FORIS FS2434, featuring a 6 mm Ultra-Slim frame, vivid display colours and EIZO’s “Smart” technologies for a more delightful gaming experience, having the monitor said to be ideal for RTS, MOBA and MMORPG genres in terms of PC gaming, as well as all genre types in terms of console gaming.

The 6 mm frame is said to consist of a 2 mm bezel and 4 mm border at the LCD panel edges, creating a smooth viewing when in a multi-monitor working environment, as well as providing an immersive gaming experience. Also, the FORIS FS2434’s IPS LCD panel along with its wide 178 degrees viewing angle is said to provide vibrant colors with few contrast changes, while the extremely low 0.05 frames input lag is said to provide no delay between signal input and image display on the screen.

Being a FORIS FS monitor, the 23.8″ 6 mm frame FS 2434 display also comes with three of EIZO’s own Smart technologies in order to improve visibility and clarity during gameplay. The first is Smart Insight 2, available in the “Game” preset mode, having it identify and enhance dark areas of an image by increasing the brightness in order to make it easier to see enemies. The FS2434 also adds an extra feature to the Smart Insight 2, having it enhance saturation in addition to brightness in order to bring greater contrast between characters and the background in a game.

The second technology is Smart Resolution, having it analyse an image for noise and blur in order to correct the blur without accentuating the noise, having to adjust only the areas where it is most needed. The third is Smart Detection, where the technology identifies the designated area on the screen where a video or game is played and applies the Smart Ironsight 2 or Smart Resolution whenever required.

Other technologies included in the FORIS FS2434 consist of the LED backlit, having it be controlled by a hybrid direct current and high-frequency pulse-width modulation in order to grant a flicker-free viewing at all brightness levels, as well as having a remote control and the company’s G-Ignition utility software. The G-Ignition is said to grand gamers access tp download presets created by professional gamers from gaming.eizo.com or export the user’s own customised colour modes to other gamers who also own a similar display. The software can also be used to assign hotkeys in order to quickly turn the monitor’s power and mute to ON/OFF, adjust the colour mode and aspect ratio.

In terms of connectivity, the FORIS FS2434 comes with two HDMI and one DVI-D ports, having it be compatible with PCs, consoles, Blu-Ray players and cameras. In addition, a USB 3.0 hub featuring one upstream and two downstream ports grant users the ability to connect to USB 3.0 storage devices or even connect their keyboard and mouse directly to the monitor. Also, the line-out jack allows for external speakers to be connected directly to the monitor as well, while the headphone jack grants further audio functionality.

Thank you TechPowerUp for providing us with this information
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