How to Make Windows 10 Boot Faster

Windows 10 is already an extraordinary success story for Microsoft and managed to achieve 110 million user installs in just two months. This is absolutely staggering and illustrates the huge amount of users migrating from older operating systems. Clearly, the free upgrade incentive is working wonders but there are still some concerns regarding privacy, and I’ve experienced a number of software bugs. On my own personal system, the Start Menu, Photos application and Windows Explorer stops functioning after the system powers on after sleep. This is infuriating and happened on quite a few occasions.

As with any new operating system, the software glitches will be rectified and it’s just a matter of patience. Another complaint regarding Windows 10 is the boot times on SSDs. While it’s not slow, booting in some cases can take longer than Windows 8/8.1. Thankfully, Lifehacker reported on a hidden setting which dramatically improves boot times.

To enable fast startup, please follow these instructions:

  1. “Search for and open “Power options” in the Start Menu.
  2. Click “Choose what the power buttons do” on the left side of the window.
  3. Click “Change settings that are currently unavailable.”
  4. Under “Shutdown settings” make sure “Turn on fast startup” is enabled.”

As you can see from the screenshot, this doesn’t affect restart times but should theoretically improve cold boot times by a significant margin. Furthermore, the majority of PCs which have a fresh install will have this setting disabled. As a result, it’s certainly worth taking the time to enable fast startup.

Have you experienced any problems with Windows 10?

Intel 750 Series SSD Firmware Update Improves Boot Times

Intel’s 750 series SSD incorporates astonishingly high read/write speeds but encountered slow boot times compared to traditional SATA storage devices. Thankfully, Intel has released a firmware update today which addresses the prolonged boot problems. To upgrade your SSD to the latest version, all you have to is download the Intel Solid-State Drive Data Center Tool. Once downloaded, launch the installer and you should encounter much more consistent boot speeds.

However, PCIe drives require a longer period to initialize and it’s highly doubtful if the boot speeds will match SATA SSDs. Despite this, the drive’s extra few seconds on boot isn’t going to be a major issue as NVME SSDs are mainly used for professional situations and these machines are on for days at a time. I’m also pleased to see Intel addressing this and PCIe SSDs offer such an enormous performance boost that they could replace SATA drives in the future. Although, the average end-user isn’t going to notice a distinct difference in consumer tasks like games.

If you’re interested in a 750 series SSD, feel free to check out our comprehensive review here

What size of SSD do you currently have and is it M.2, SATA or PCIe?

Thank you The Tech Report for providing us with this information.

New Exoskeleton Boots Make You More Efficient

Walking with a spring in your step, something that is about to become a very literal thing. The new exoskeleton technology doesn’t need advanced robotics or a medical procedure to enjoy its benefits. It slips on like a boot, uses your own muscle power to operate and can make walking a whole lot easier.

Engineers at Carnegie Mellon University created the effort-reducing ankle exoskeleton. The walking assist clutch operates a spring in parallel to your Achilles tendon, which in turn offloads strain on the calf muscles and makes walking easier. This can help people walk further and longer, but could also help people who have difficulty in moving, or existing medical conditions that require you to reduce the strain on your legs.

“I’ll tell you, it feels really cool,” Sawicki said. “There’s a comfortable sort of squishiness for the first 10 minutes. But then it becomes totally transparent. Your body just integrates it.”

It’s still in the prototype stage, but the inexpensive solution is still very cool and one we look forward to seeing developed further.

“When you take it off, you’re like, ‘oh, crap,'” Sawicki said. “You don’t realize how much it helped until it’s gone. You feel really clunky for a few minutes.”

Thank you Washington Post for providing us with this information.

 

Android Phones Could Be ‘Converted’ into Windows-Powered Handsets with Custom ROMs

Microsoft has revealed that it will provide its Windows 10 OS to a select group of Xiaomi Mi4 users in an initiative to expand the Windows-powered mobile OS beyond its Lumia handsets. Sources say that it effectively overrides Android, turning the Xiaomi phone into a Windows 10 device complete with Microsoft services.

“As part of the Windows Insider Program, Microsoft will partner with Xiaomi to offer Windows 10 free downloads to a select group of Xiaomi Mi4 users. Xiaomi Mi4 users will get the ability to flash their phones with the new Windows 10 OS and provide feedback to Xiaomi and Microsoft on their experience. This partnership will allow Xiaomi and Microsoft to get direct user feedback and continue to improve the experience for China. Microsoft is thrilled to see Xiaomi embracing Windows 10 and offering this great value to their customers. We’re excited to see the feedback we receive from this audience.

Xiaomi is a leading phone manufacturer in China undergoing significant global expansion. We are excited to partner with them in China and jointly gather feedback from Chinese users on their experience with Windows 10 to jointly collaborate on product and services development for the platform.

Availability will be announced in the months to come.”

The install is done by flashing the device’s ROM, effectively removing the possibility of a dual-boot, an approach similar to the Cyanogen OS project. Also, Xiaomi was Microsoft’s first option due to the fact that it has a strong community of users who provide feedback on the company’s weekly software updates.

It looks like Microsoft has big plans in offering the customization to a wider variety of devices, should the trial prove to be a success.

Thank you TechCrunch for providing us with this information

Hide Your Windows, Mac And Linux Devices, ‘Cause Java-based Malware Is Coming!

We have seen similar incidents in the past, may it be ad-related such as the Yahoo! incident, or directly involving the Java platform. It has been reported that a Java-based malware bot is currently ‘roaming’ around, infecting all three major operating systems: Windows, Mac OS X and Linux.

Researchers have revealed a fragment of botnet malware that is capable of infecting the latter mentioned OSes, being a cross-platform HEUR:Backdoor.Java.Agent.a, having been reported in a blog post published by Kaspersky Lab. It reportedly takes control of computers by exploiting CVE-2013-2465, a critical Java vulnerability which Oracle patched last June.

The Java vulnerability is said to be present on Java 7 Update 21 and earlier versions. Once the malware has infected the computer, it copies itself to the autostart directory of its respective platform to ensure it runs at every startup. Compromised computers then report to an Internet relay chat channel that acts as a command and control server.

It is reportedly designed to generate Distributed-Denial-of-Service, or DDnS, which targets the attacker wants to designate as a ‘target’, having it packed with ‘features’ such as setting the IP address, port number, intensity, and duration of attacks. The malware is said to be written entirely in Java, allowing it to run on Windows OS X and Linux machines. To make matters even worse, the bot incorporates PircBot, an IRC programming interface based on Java.

In addition to all that, the malware also is said to use Zelix Klassmaster obfuscator to prevent it from being reverse engineered by whitehat and competing blackhat hackers. Apart from obfuscating bytecode, Zelix encrypts some of the inner workings of the malware. It is extremely recommended to update to the latest Java 7 Update 51 found on Oracle’s official website here.

Thank you arstechnica for providing us with this inforamtion
Image courtesy of arstechnica