AOC Introduces U2879VF 4K UHD Monitor

UHD 4K resolution monitors are the best thing that happened to productivity since the introduction of multi-monitor setups simply due to the extended amount of displayable pixels. Having more pixels on the screen allows you to view a lot of things at once and have a lot bigger area visible when using extreme zooms for close-up edits and that saves a lot of unnecessary switching between apps and scrolling around. There already are quite a few 4K displays on the market by now, but that doesn’t mean that there isn’t room for one more in the form of AOC’s newly introduced 4K UHD monitor U2879VF.

The new AOC U2879VF can display more than 1 billion colours (8-bit+FRC) with its 28-inch (71.1 cm) TN panel for a resolution up to 3840 x 2160 pixels. This is coupled with an ultra-fast response time of just 1 ms and the U2879VF also features Adaptive-Sync support and is thereby FreeSync compatible. While 4K still is somewhat of a gimmick when it comes to gaming, those who use it will surely appreciate this feature and the low input lag that comes along with it.

The monitor comes with both modern and legacy connectors as it features HDMI 2.0, DisplayPort 1.2a+ as well as DVI and D-Sub. Especially the HDMI 2.0 port is a great thing to see and one that has been missing on other monitors in this category in the past. The increased bandwidth of up to 18 Gbps makes it able to deliver 60fps 4K content on this port too. The HDMI port is also MHL compatible which allows you to display content directly from a smartphone or tablet device while charging its battery at the same time.

AOC also added their Flicker-Free technology to the monitor to ease the eye strain during long periods of work. A Picture by Picture (PBP) function has also been added which makes it possible to view content from two input sources at the same time.

The AOC U2879VF has a planned availability set for March 2016 and an MSRP of £279.99.

AOC Launches U2477PWQ 23.6″ 4K 60Hz Monitor

UHD 4K resolution has made its entry all the way down to smartphones and tablets, but most desktop monitors are still quite large and maybe not the best suitable solution for tight office spaces. That doesn’t mean that you don’t want the extra clarity and resolution that a 4K panel can provide and for that AOC launched the compact 23.6-inch U2477PWQ monitor sporting HDMI 2.0 and 60Hz at a 3840 x 2160 resolution.

The PLS panel delivers a good colour uniformity at any viewing angle (178/178 degrees) and exploits 100% of the sRGB colour gamut. A 4ms response time might not be the fastest, but anything below 5ms should be usable for gaming too.

The AOC U2477PWQ comes with DisplayPort 1.2, HDMI 2.0, DVI and VGA for connectivity to pretty much any device. If your smart devices are compatible, then the MHL allows you to both display content from a smartphone or tablet directly on the monitor while charging it at the same time. The flicker-free technology should also help reduce eye stress while using the monitor, something everyone can appreciate that has worked at a monitor for longer periods of time.

The included and pretty stylish stand allows for a pivot, but not swivel. You can tilt it -5 to plus 23 degrees and adjust the height with up to 130mm. Should this not be sufficient, then you can mount it on a 100×100 VESA compatible arm or stand.

The AOC U2477PWQ will be available in November 2015. The MSRP will be £289. As with all of its displays, AOC offers a 3-year warranty with on-site exchange service.

MMD Refreshes E-Line Displays with 3 New Philips Models

MMD, a leading brand license partner for Philips Monitors, announced a refreshed line-up of consumer displays with three new models. The first new monitor is a 23-inch version using an AH-IPS panel while the last two monitors feature PLS LED panels and are 24-inch and 27-inch respectively. All three of the latest E-Line displays are said to “offer vivid, true-to-life colours and wide-angle viewing, styled in an elegance-inspired design for a light, fresh face in any home or office.”

IPS panels are the preferred ones by most people, so let’s start with the 237E (237E7QDSB) 23-inch monitor. The stand and frame is a glossy black finish with edge-to-edge glass and narrow borders. The narrow borders give minimal viewing distractions and also allow easy setups with multiple monitors. For an extra sleek look, the front border is kept free of touch buttons, instead the monitor features a discreetly placed EasySelect toggle key on the rear to make quick adjustments to monitor settings. You can spot the EasySelect key on the bottom left side in the photo below.

The EasyToogle button is present on all three new monitors, also on the 24-inch 246E (246E7QDSW) and 27-inch 276E (276E7QDSW) monitors. You also get the same 178-degree viewing angles, Full-HD resolution at 60Hz, and a 250 cd/m² brightness on all three models.

Besides the difference in panel type, the three new Philips monitors are almost identical. The 24-inch and 27-inch monitors use PLS LED technology and aren’t black. Instead, they are available in a glossy white finish with a slim and elegant metal stand. Colour-wise, the two can reproduce 82% of the NTSC colour gamut.

All three displays come with technology features such as Philips Flicker-free, SmartContrast, Economy mode, and SmartImage Lite. Connection wise you get an analog VGA D-Sub connector, a digital HDCP DVI-D connector, and an MHL-HDMI connector, making them suitable for almost any system. That even goes for mobile devices that are MHL-capable. With an optional MHL cable, you can connect it directly and charge the mobile device at the same time.

The new Philips displays 237E7QDSB, 246E7QDSW and 276E7QDSW will be available at the beginning of November at £149, £159 and £219 respectively.

ASRock Z170 Gaming-ITX/ac offers native 4K 60Hz Video Out

ASRock has come a very long way over the last years, moving from a budget company to a force that shouldn’t be dismissed, and that is proven again by the quite impressive Fata1ty branded Z170 Gaming-ITX/ac mini-ITX motherboard. Despite its size, it packs amazing features and a solid build quality.

The first feature to stand out on this little marvel is the native 4K 60Hz video output capabilities thanks to the HDMI 2.0 port. HDMI 2.0 was introduced quite a while ago, but its adoption has been more than sluggish. That also means that this is the first 100-series chipset mITX motherboard with just that feature.

Moving on and you’ll find anything else that you’ll want from a Gaming motherboard. ASRock added the Fatal1ty mouse port, Intel-based Gigabit Ethernet connectivity, and an 802.11ac wireless network card.

The Gaming-ITX motherboard features plenty of USB connections, ranging from USB 2.0 to USB 3.1, SATA3 ports, a single SATA-Express port. Other connections include a PS2 dual-port, onboard audio, a PCIe x16 Gen3 slot, and more. Hidden on the rear of the motherboard you’ll also find an ultra M.2 slot.

The motherboard is built on an 8-layer PCB and adopts an eight power phase design. IUt’s further built with Super Alloy and Gaming Armor design, such as the Premium 60A Power Chokes, Dual-Stack MOSFET, Nichicon 12K Platinum Capacitors, Hi-Density Power Connector, 15μ gold contacts and Digi Power.

ASRock didn’t reveal a global availability or MSRP price, but it can already be had in some regions such as Germany where it retails starting from €193.04. It surely isn’t the cheapest, but it’s also quite impressive on its feature list.

R9 Fury Perfect for the Living Room? Possibly Not!

In a move that might snatch defeat from the jaws of victory, information has been revealed that the new R9 Fury GPU will not support HDMI 2.0 nor DP 1.3. This comes from a forum post on Overclockers.co.uk by what appears to be an AMD representative. Asked to confirm if the card would support HDMI 2.0, this was the answer given by AMDMatt:

If this post is accurate, the Fury will not only not be supporting HDMI 2.0. HDMI 2.0 is critical as the industry moves to 4K, something AMD has been pushing heavily. HDMI 2.0 allows for 4K @60Hz, something currently impossible with HDMI 1.4. DisplayPort 1.3, also not supported enables 2 4K @60Hz screens to be driven or 5K and 8K in certain modes at 60Hz. Both are also required for HDCP 2.2 which allows BluRay 4K discs to play with copyright protection. While DisplayPort 1.2a does allow for 4K@60Hz, users with HDMI 4K TVs, which have become quite prevalent, will be left at a console level 30Hz. Fury Nano, if also similarly handicapped will have it’s HTPC ambitions hurt as well.

For now, there is no need to get riled up just yet. This is just one post so far and AMDMatt might be misinformed. It will be best to save any pitchforks till official word comes out from AMD on their HDMI and DP support. The flexibility of DP also means that an active adapter can convert the DP 1.2a signal to HDMI 2.0, but HDCP 2.2 will be lost. If this report is true though, it makes AMD’s other mistakes this time seem trivial. Missing one of HDMI 2.0 or DP 1.3 is serious enough I tend to believe that one of the two is supported until I get official confirmation from AMD. Either way, AMD best act fast before the internet rumour mill goes out of control.

If you were hoping for high frame rates on your new 4KTV for living room gaming, HDMI 2.0 is vital.

New 34″ Ultra-Wide Display Released by Philips Featuring MHL-Capable HDMI

Philips has just added a new 34″ ultra-wide display to their range of products. The new display product code is BDM3470UP and it looks perfect for anyone who is looking for a display to work with in applications that require a big landscape-mode solution.

Brief specs can be seen below:

  • 3440 x 1440 pixel resolution
  • 5ms G2G response time
  • 60Hz refresh rate
  • 1000:1 contrast ratio
  • 320 cd/m2 brightness
  • 178/178 viewing angles
  • 1.07b colour depth
  • W-LED backlight offering sRGB gamut

The BDM3470UP screen also features Philips’ SmartUniformity mode, using dedicated metrics to assess colour accuracy and deliver at least 95% average luminance uniformity. In terms of connectivity, the display comes with MHL-capable HDMI, DisplayPort, DVI and VGA display ports, as well as 2 x USB 2.0 and 2 x USB 3.0 ports.

The 34″ display also features 2 x 3W stereo speakers and PiP / PbP support and allows the user to tilt, height, swivel and rotate as per preference. Philips is said to be selling the BDM3470UP at a price of €799.

Thank you Guru3D for providing us with this information

ASUS Announces PB279Q: 10-bit, 4K Monitor With 100% sRGB Color Gamut

ASUS announced the new PB279Q 4K/UHD monitor designed for prosumers and gamers alike. The new monitor has a 27-inch IPS display and uses a 16:9 ratio 3840 x 2160 resolution with a pixel density of 163 PPI. The 100% sRGB gamut and 10-bit colour technology will give you a billion colours displayed perfectly, may it be to view the mountains and valleys of Kyrat in FarCry 4, or your pictures and videos of the great outdoors.

The monitor has plenty of connection options with one DisplayPort, one miniDisplayPort and four HDMI ports, but it’s only the DisplayPort connections that support 60Hz. ASUS also added its EyeCare technology, consisting of a DC-controlled WLED backlight to completely avoid PWM flicker, and low-blue light modes to reduce eye-strain. Further ASUS-exclusive technologies inside include SplendidPlus Video Intelligence Technology with eight display modes, QuickFit Virtual Scale, VividPixel Technology and GamePlus Technology.

The PB279Q isn’t the fastest on the block with the 5ms grey-to-grey refresh rate, but it should be enough for enjoyable gaming as well as anything else. Picture in Picture and Picture by Picture modes further enhance the abilities of this large display that comes with a narrow 9mm bezel.

The ASUS PB279Q will be available from mid-December in Taiwan, Asia Pacific, and Europe. Prices start from $799 USD and may vary by region. Overclockers UK have it listed as pre-order with an estimated arrival on the 19th and with a price of £679.99.

Specifications:

  • 27-inches, 16:9
  • 3840 x 2160 @ 60Hz via DisplayPort/Mini DisplayPort
  • 3840 x 2160 @ 30Hz via via HDMI
  • 1.07 billion colors (10-bit)
  • 300cd/m² brightness
  • Pixel pitch 0.155mm / 163 PPI
  • Viewing angles 178 degrees (H) / 178 degrees (V)
  • Brightness (max) 300cd/m2
  • Contrast ratio 100,000,000:1
  • Audio 2-Watt stereo speakers
  • 1 x DisplayPort 1.2, 1 x Mini DisplayPort (mDP) 1.2, 4 x HDMI/MHL, 3.5mm Earphone-out, 3.5mm Audio-in
  • Stand Tilt: +20°~-5°, Swivel: ±60°, Pivot: 90° clockwise
  • Height adjustment: 0~150mm
  • VESA wall mount: 100 x 100mm
  • Size (WxHxD) 640.78 x 429.84 (lowest) x 240mm (With stand) and 624.96 x 368.23 x 58.8mm (Without stand)
  • Estimated Weight: 7.7kg

Thanks to ASUS for providing us with this information

Images courtesy of ASUS

Xbox One Users Experiencing TV Motion Judder

It’s another day and yet another problem has been troubling users of the new Xbox One. One of the many new features that Microsoft have added to the console is integrating the output from a TV receiver into the front end. Mixing this with the OneGuide service, users are presented with a simplified viewing experience where everything can be done from the console. Naturally not every user is going to use a separate box, but those that do are more than likely going to have a strong interest in setting up this service.

Where the new problem has arisen is with regards to the signal that the console receives from the attached TV receiver. Most of the home entertainment systems that are available here in the UK work on a 50Hz input/ output, however Microsoft’s consoles work to the US standard of 60Hz. What this effectively means is that the Xbox and TV receiver are working to two different standards and with the Xbox running at a higher rate, there is going to be a visual indication that something is wrong.

In a similar way to the lag that gamers experience when their graphics card is put under a heavy workload in-game, Xbox One users are experiencing motion judder as repeated frames are being displayed at a higher rate than what the console is receiving. At this moment in time Microsoft are looking to work on a permanent fix for this problem (only adding to the workload they already have from the numerous other problems that have come to light), however there is only a temporary fix that tricks the console to output at 50Hz.

A reader from HDTVtest, a UK-based TV review site, has listed a guide for users to follow which defaults the One to a 50Hz output signal, thus eliminating the stuttering effect that may have been seen. In this guide, ‘kevgallacher’ instructs users to go into their screen settings, change the input to auto-detect HDMI and set the resolution to 1080p. When applying the settings, the console will ask if this display has appeared correctly and by selecting ‘no’, the console will drop the output from 60Hz down to 50Hz.

This issue is likely to affect users that are not just in the UK, however it is going to be a region specific issue; affecting only those who are in countries where broadcasts are made at 50Hz. Until Microsoft can come up for a permanent solution for this, ideally with an option being added to the system settings, this manual fix will have to do the trick.

Source: CNET