Razer Offers 50% Off For One Day Only

These days you can’t just play a game, you must have everything to play it. From your mobile phone being turned into a Gameboy to remote controlling a tank with a PS4 controller, the consoles don’t always take the highlight. Events like CES bring together companies from all over the technology industry came together and they notice how much you care. Razer wants’ to thank everyone, by offering you 50% off for one day only.

At CES, Razer was awarded the Best of CES People’s Choice award, something that apparently has not happened before in the 49 years since CES started. To thank everyone, they’ve decided that on the 15th of January a special deal will be open to offering 50% of all their peripherals.

In order to claim this deal you will need two things, firstly you will need a Razer Insider account. Secondly, you will need to have linked the Insider account to your Razer ID. Guidelines on how to do all this can be found here, as well as the link you need to retrieve your code to activate the discount.

It should be noted that this discount is only available on peripherals and accessories, so no buying a giant Razer system for 50% off. The worst part of this deal can be found in the terms and conditions, though:

  • Each customer/shipping destination is allowed to place only one (1) order with a maximum of one (1) item.
  • Only the first order from each customer/shipping destination will be accepted and any subsequent orders will be cancelled. In addition, Razer reserves the sole and absolute discretion to cancel any orders that exceed the limit stated above. Razer shall not be liable to any customer in relation to such cancellations.

With the offer running from the 15th at 9 am GMT to the 16th at 8.59am people in Europe will have some nice Friday night shopping to look ahead of them. Don’t worry if you’re in another region, though, as the deals are available in for customers located in North America/Asia-Pacific, for more details and how to redeem this deal check out the page here.

Turtle Beach Ear Force Recon 50 PC Gaming Headset Review

Introduction


Picking the right headset is no easy task, although it may seem quite simple. There’s a huge range of products on the market to pick from, so many that it can be quite daunting trying to find the one that will best suits your needs, or your bank balance. The latest from Turtle Beach, the Recon 50, is targeted at the budget-friendly end of the market and with an RRP of just £29.99, it’s certainly going to appeal to a large part of the market. Obviously, that low price does mean it’s not going to be as amazing as some of the more expensive products on the market, but I am eager to see just how much you can get for such a small price tag.

“Experience the sleek, lightweight design and crystal clear audio of the Ear Force Recon 50 gaming headset. With 40mm Neodymium speakers and in-line controls, the Recon 50 conveniently places Mic Mute and Master Volume at your fingertips, and you can use the high-sensitivity adjustable boom mic for in-game and online chat, and then remove it when listening to music and watching movies. The Ear Force Recon 50 connects to virtually any PC, Mac and mobile/tablet device, and is also compatible with the PlayStation 4 controller, the new Xbox One controller with the 3.5mm headset jack, and other Xbox One controllers via the EAR FORCE Headset Audio Controller (sold separately).”

With powerful drivers, a detachable microphone, multi-format support, a lightweight design, and even a basic in-line controller, the Recon 50 isn’t exactly shy on the features you’re actually going to need. Let’s jump right in and take a closer look at what this headset has to offer.

The packaging is typical Turtle Beach, bright colours and a stylish picture of the headset, with a few of the main specs detailed down the side.

Around the back, we have more information detailing the 40mm drivers, mobile support and detachable microphone.

In the box, you’ll find the headset (obviously), as well as a quick start guide, detachable boom microphone and a 3.5mm 4-pole to dual 3.5mm 3-pole adapter cable.

The Recon 50 comes hard-wired, making it plug and play ready with most devices, including mobile. Just remember that you’ll need the adapter cable (see above) to use the microphone and audio on PC.

What is a little worrying is that the cable is quite thin, especially the part that goes from each driver to the in-line controller. They’re no thicker than most in-ear headphone cables and while they’re going to do the job just fine, extra care should be taken as they could be a little more prone to breaking if you’re a bit rough with them. The in-line controller is a bit basic, but it does have a master volume control and a microphone mute switch, so it’s certainly a welcome addition to the setup.

At first glance, the headset looks to follow the design of most other Turtle Beach headsets. It still has that oval ear cup shape and mounting system, as well as a semi-open back design. However, a few things are slightly different, such as some cheaper materials being used, which is no doubt a requirement for the price to be brought down lower.

The headband is quite thin and while there is an extension slider on each side, the interior components are also plastic. They’ll do the job, but I’d be careful not to sit on your headset any time soon.

On the bottom edge of the headset, there’s a jack socket for the boom microphone. I do like that the microphone is detachable, as it means the headset can double up as headphones for mobile devices.

The ear cups fold inwards, which is great for when you’re wearing the headset around your neck between games.

There’s a good amount of padding on the ear cups, which does provide a snug fit while the leather coverings help block a lot of external noise. They’re a little uncomfortable at first, but as it often the case with this type of padding, it takes time to wear-in to the user. The 40mm drivers in this headset are quite surprising, they’re quite powerful at max volume, have a good amount of  base and bright and clear treble. There could ideally be a little more punch to the mid-ranges, but for gaming, watching movies and listening to music, they sound on par or above most headsets in this price range.

The headband on the Recon 50 is quite thin, with a grippy rubber coating on the top and a little bit of Turtle Beach branding.

There’s minimal padding on the interior, with a rubber grip coating. This isn’t great for comfort, but the headset is lightweight, so you can get away with it. The main issue is that the red rubber coating grips your hair, sure it keeps the headset in place, but trying to adjust the headset during use can feel a little uncomfortable.

The microphone boom isn’t the most flexible, but you can bend it a bit to get a more ideal speaking position. Much like the drivers, I was pleasantly surprised by the microphone performance. It’s bright and clear with no distortion and at this price, that’s more than enough to make me happy.

Amazon to Launch 6-Inch $50 Tablet

Amazon’s ambitious first foray into the smart-device market has been fairly disastrous and struggled to compete with huge brands such as Apple at higher price tiers. As a result, Amazon is reportedly shifting their focus to the budget sector and preparing a 6-inch $50 tablet. In theory, this is a pretty cogent idea as the low retail price should widen the device’s appeal and reduce the barrier to entry. Amazon’s financial strategy revolves around services and inexpensive tablets could bring a whole host of new subscribers to Prime and the Kindle store.

However, there are alternatives from unknown Chinese brands under $50 which could eke away at their market share. Despite this, Amazon could dominate sales in the budget tablet sector due to their reliable customer service and brand identity. Although, this move does seem a little strange considering Amazon recently fired “dozens” of engineers from “lab126” which created the company’s Fire handsets.

Perhaps, Amazon sees some success as a hardware company at the lower-end and expects this move to create a strong foothold. If the $50 tablet manages to impress, consumers might become more inclined to try out a premium Amazon tablet.

Do you own any Amazon-designed hardware?

Thank you The Wall Street Journal for providing us with this information.

Intel Edison Platform Has Started Shipping

The Internet of Things is expected to be the next big technology revolution, with more than 50 billion connected devices by 2020, and Intel wants to be part of this. In their keynote speech during IDF 2014, they announced that the new Intel Edison developer platform has finally started shipping. We first heard about Edison during CES in January and many people have been waiting to get their hands on this tiny device ever since, hobby builder and Internet of Things developers alike.

The Intel Edison is what you could call small form-factor with its 35.5 x 25 x 3.9 mm size; about the size of a stamp or SD card. That didn’t hold Intel back from packing it full of power, featuring a Dual-Core Silvermont Atom processor running at 500 MHz with support from a Quark processor running at 100 MHz. It has 1 GB DDR3 memory in a 2 x 32 bit configuration and 4 GB eMMC storage. The WiFi capabilities don’t lack either with 2.4/5 GHz dual-band 802.11 a/b/g/n W-Lan and Bluetooth 4.0 powered by the Broadcom 43340 controller.

It is a somewhat odd pairing of the two CPU’s, but it should work well. The Atom takes care of all the main tasks of the SoC while the Quark serves as an embedded micro-controller responsible for running other side-tasks. The entire Edison board can be used as it is or attached to additional developer boards and is compatible to the current Arduino ecosystem.

As for pricing, it doesn’t come in as cheap as the Raspberry Pi and you’ll have to shell out $50 for the Edison module. If you’d like the breakout board kit it will be another $10, making it $60 total. The Arduino kit will costs $85, which is probably the most interesting combination for aspiring developers.

Thank you endgadget for providing us with this information

Images courtesy of Intel