Shuhei Yoshida Defends PlayStation VR’s Basic Package

PlayStation VR’s launch price is designed to provide a more affordable entry into virtual reality technology and encourage mainstream audiences to become early adopters. However, many users have criticized Sony for their marketing policy and failure to include the PlayStation Camera with the basic VR bundle. As a result, you cannot use the headset without the camera which increases the price from $400 to $460. Arguably, this hidden cost is similar to Sony’s use of proprietary memory cards on the Vita. Despite these concerns, the President of Sony’s Worldwide Studios, Shuhei Yoshida explained why the company decided to take this step and told Colin Moriarty and Tim Gettys on Kinda Funny’s PlayStation podcast:

“Yeah, ‘PSVR is not $400 it’s $460!’ Yeah. I saw these comments. [Laughter] Pretty early in the process, we decided to not bundle the camera because we know that many people already own the camera. Especially people who purchased the PS4 in the first year. So those people, if we bundle, as a standard, a camera — another one — you know they would be mad. You know because they can’t do anything with it because the PS4 can only accept one camera. Maybe sell it on eBay or whatever. And the same thing with Move. The camera is required, but we know many people already own it. So we don’t put it in the basic product. This week’s announcement [GDC announcement] for us is to announce the base unit. That’s consistent globally and for people we know…who already own cameras. We don’t want them to spend more money than necessary.”

Honestly, I’m not convinced by this argument because the PlayStation Camera was always an additional extra which didn’t bring anything exciting to existing games. Therefore, I’d be interested in seeing how many people actually own the camera across various regions. Whatever the case, Sony will be releasing other bundles with everything you need to get started.

Corsair Carbide 400Q Mid-Tower Chassis Review

Introduction


The Corsair Carbide series is one of the most established and popular ranges in the entire PC chassis market. There have been many entries in this range, such as the Air 540, Air 240Spec-01, 100R, 330R, and the recently released 600Q, which was and is the bigger brother of the 400Q we’ll be reviewing today.

Designed to suit a wide range of system builds, there isn’t much the Carbide series doesn’t have to offer. The 400 chassis comes in two variants, the 400C, which comes with a large side panel window, and the 400Q, which comes with a solid side panel, as well as thick layers of sound dampening material for whisper quiet performance.

“The Carbide Series Clear 400C and Quiet 400Q were designed as refined, elegant, and compact ATX chassis with modern layout and features. By removing the 5.25” ODD bays, the 400 series reduces the footprint of the chassis front to back, and simultaneously improves on cooling since there are no drive bays in the airflow path. “

The 400Q is certainly well equipped, and it’s capable of housing some fairly high-end hardware that should make it appeal to those wanting a gaming system build, but let’s skip through these technical details and take a closer look at it ourselves!

As you can see, the 400Q has a fairly understated appearance. That’s not to say it looks boring, but it’s certainly not leaping out to grab your attention while still giving off a premium quality vibe. There’s a solid steel panel on the left side, with a fair bit of ventilation on the edge of the front panel for any front mounted fans/radiators.

The right side is pretty much the same, another solid panel, and even more ventilation for the front panel.

The front panel keeps that bold theme going, with a very minimal, although nicely finished panel. The only thing breaking up the design is an equally understated Corsair logo; the only really visible branding on the chassis exterior.

Around the back, you’ll find a 120mm pre-installed exhaust fan, with elongated mounting holes, allowing you to adjust the height of the fan; this will also increase AIO cooler compatibility. There are seven expansion slots, each fitted with reusable and ventilated filters. Down at the bottom, a PSU mount with a slide out dust filter; nothing too fancy, but everything you would need is here.

The top panel comes fitted with a hard cover that is held in place by magnets. This cover will help reduce noise from the system.

Under the cover, you’ll find 120 and 140mm elongated fan and radiator fittings, handy if you need to add extra cooling performance to the build. You’ll get a 240/280mm radiator here easily.

On the front panel, there are all the basics, such as the power and reset buttons, a pair of high-speed USB 3.0 ports and HD audio jacks.

Tesla Announces Roadster 3.0 – With 400 Mile Range

Luxury electric car maker Tesla has announced a new version of the Tesla Roadster, the 3.0. Most interestingly it has a range of 400 miles – unprecedented in electric vehicles that usually max out at 100 miles.

The Tesla Roadster has a 70kWh battery pack that is the same size as the original Roadster’s 53kWh pack. This yields an impressive 400 mile range, making it the first EV to be able to drive from San Francisco to Los Angeles on one charge. The original Roadster was Tesla’s first vehicle, however it was not met with the same level of success as its successor, the Model S saloon car. The original Roadster was seen more as of an experiment for Tesla, a company founded by PayPal billionaire Elon Musk.

Pricing and a release date for the new car has yet to be released.

Source: TechCrunch

Turtle Beach Stealth 400 Multi-Format Wireless Headset Review

Introduction


It’s fairly common for gamers to own more than one console, and when you’re ready to play online, the last thing you want to be doing is trying to find the right headset for the right console. The best way to reduce the need for multiple headsets is to purchase a multi-format headset; that’s where the new Turtle Beach Stealth 400 comes into play. The Stealth 400 is compatible with PlayStation 3, PlayStation 4 and mobile device. This means that quickly flicking between consoles should be relatively easy, with the added bonus that you can take the headset on the go with you for use with your mobile device.

The Turtle Beach Stealth 400 is a wireless headset, meaning you won’t have to suffer from trailing cables while gaming. Not all devices allow for wireless connectivity, so Turtle Beach have also included a 4-pole 3.5mm cable that will work great for hooking the headset up to your phone, tablet, mp3 player, or portable gaming device such as the PlayStation Vita.

The headset comes with a range of connectivity options, such as the USB transmitter, which has an optical input (TosLink cable included). The headset is equipped with powerful 50mm drivers and a removable omni-directional microphone.

  • Speakers: 50mm with Neodymium Magnets
  • Speaker Impedance: 32Ω
  • Frequency Response: 20Hz – 20kHz
  • Headband/Earpad Material: Fabric (Black) with Foam Cushioning
  • Microphone Design: Removable Omni-Directional Microphone

The dongle is easy enough to use, it’s just a USB plug on one end that you can connect to your console and there’s a small optical cable port on the side.

The detachable microphone has a flexible boom to better adjust your speaking position. Of course, you can completely remove it should you not need it.

The construction of the headset is mostly plastic, which helps keep the overall weight of the unit as low as possible.

Because this is a wireless headset, all the major controls have been placed on the underside of the drivers. Here you will find chat and game volume dials, a preset toggle button, the USB recharging port and the 3.5mm jack for mobile use.

Separate from the other controls you’ll also find the microphone master mute button; this way you don’t knock the volume dials when you need a little privacy.

The left driver has a recessed jack socket for the microphone.

The plastics on the Stealth 400 have been given a lightly textured matte finish, with the exception of a small glossy panel on the back of each driver. Despite its plastic construction, the headset feels very tough and durable.

There’s a rough rubber texture to the top of the headband, where you’ll also notice the embossed Turtle Beach logo.

The headband comes with slide out extenders which lock firmly into place. The headset has a good range of extension that should make it suitable for younger gamers, as well as adults.

The ear cups can be rotated inwards, allowing for a better fit against your ears, while also meaning they’re more comfortable to wear around your neck between games. The padding on the drivers is quite hard, but it’s got a nice soft external cloth cover and they should break-in over time to become more comfortable.

Overall a really nice looking headset with understated looks. I like the blue trim around the ear cups, but given the name “stealth”, perhaps all black would have been a little bit cooler.