AMD R9 380X Exact Specifications Leaked

With just over a month until the expected launch, more information on AMD’s Radeon R9 380X have surfaced. Last time around, we got a glimpse of the XFX Double Dissipation model and today we’re treated to the full specifications

Unlike the R9 285/380, the 380X will feature the full Tonda die. Tonga was originally launched last year cut down to 1792 shader units, 112 TMUs and 32 ROPs over a 256bit GGDR5. Keeping the same 256bit bus, the 380X will feature 2048 shader units, 128 TMUs and 32 ROPs, a hardware parity with the aged 280X. Given the architectural improvements GCN 1.2 introduced starting with Tonga, the 380X should place at least 10% faster than its predecessor. Clock speeds also get a boost up to between 1000~1100Mhz while GDDR5 speeds will stay about the at around 5500Mhz~6000Mhz.

With better performance and DX12 support, among other advantages compared to the GTX 770, AMD has a good chance to dominate the $150 gap between Nvidia’s GTX 960 and 970. The 380X may also come standard with 4GB of VRAM as 2GB is probably a bit too low for this tier of performance. If the 380X does well in the market, it will be interesting to see if Nvidia will respond with an even more cut down GM204 in the form of a GTX 960Ti, cut prices on the 970 or simply just wait it out till Pascal.

Thank you HWBattle for providing us with this information

AMD Radeon R9 380X May Land In Late October

Ever since AMD debuted Tonga Pro in the R9 285, everyone had been waiting for the full Tonga XT die. Earlier this week, we got our first hint with the glimpse of the XFX Double Dissipation R9 390X. Today, we’re getting word that the R9 380X will finally arrive in late October, a little over a month from now. This will fill the relatively large gap between the R9 380  and 390.

With GCN 1.2, the R9 380X will bring the efficiency gains first demonstrated in the R9 285. The card will feature 2048 Stream Processors, 128 TMUs and 32 ROPs connected to 4GB of GDDR5 across a 256bit bus. With GCN 1.2’s improved architecture, the 380X should perform about 10% faster than the 280X at the same clocks. Despite a drop in raw bandwidth compared to the 280X, the introduction of delta color compression should alleviate any issues. The card should also feature good DX12 support with asynchronous compute as well as FreeSync.

Unlike the earlier R9 370X which was limited to China, the 380X will be available worldwide. With full Tonga on tap, AMD should be able to strike at the hole Nvidia has left between the 960 an 970. This should hopefully help AMD make some more revenue, gain some market share and be more competitive overall. The only spoiler would be if Nvidia somehow introduced a GTX 960 Ti.

Thank you Fudzilla for providing us with this information

AMD Hawaii GPUs Returning With Radeon 300 Series

It’s not uncommon for current generation graphics cards to be tweaked, improved and rebranded to become part of the next-generation launch. This time around, it seems that the current line-up of Hawaii GPUs, such as the Radeon R9 290 cards, will be treated to an overclock and the addition of more VRAM However, it’s important to point out that any rebranded cards will not feature the upcoming HBM memory that the new flagship cards will feature.

It’s hard to nail down what new cards are what, as they’ve not yet been given a confirmed codename. We suspect that cards such as the R9 380 will be a rebrand of the current R9 285, but that information will no doubt become clearer closer to the launch. The Hawaii HX has a mild overclock, but a significant boost in memory speed, as well as a move from 4GB to 8GB of VRAM; the same goes for the Hawaii Pro.

Check out this list of expected 300 series cards below. It’s incomplete, but given that many of the cards aren’t confirmed yet, only rumoured and leaked, there’s still plenty more information to discover.

Personally, I’m happy to see the better picks from the current range get a boost, as they offer some great price vs performance ratios, while the bump in VRAM will help push 4K gaming into the mainstream. However, I’m personally sitting and waiting for the higher-end all-new cards with HBM, such as the R9 380X and 390X.

Thank you VideoCardz for providing us with this information.

EK Release Full-Cover Waterblock for the Radeon R9 285

EK Water Blocks has introduced their latest Full-Cover water block, this time for the reference design of AMD’s Radeon R9 285 series graphics cards. The new EK-FC R9-285 will cool all the vital parts on your graphics card: GPU, RAM and VRM. The central inlet split-flow cooling engine design used in this cooler will work flawless in both directions and has excellent hydraulic performance that also allows it to be used with weaker pumps.

The base is made of nickel-plated electrolytic copper while the top is made of quality POM Acetal or Acrylic depending on what design you chose. The EK-FC R9-285 full-cover water block should be available shortly at your favourite water-cooling supplier and it has an MSRP of €99.95 while an optional backplate will be available for €26.95.

Thanks to EKWB for providing us with this information

Images courtesy of EKWB

Sapphire R9 285 “Tonga” ITX Compact Edition Graphics Card Winner!

It’s that awesome time of the week again where once again I get to make one of you incredibly happy, and with a shiny Sapphire R9 285 Tonga graphics card to play around with, who wouldn’t be! The Tonga is a great card for a compact gaming rig or HTPC and it’s one of the funkiest little cards on the market.

First of all, a massive thank you to Sapphire for helping us organise and give away this awesome prize, but most of all, congratulations to…

 Mark Adams of Shropshire

Don’t feel too bad if you didn’t win this time around, we’ve got a LOT of great prizes coming to the site very soon and several other great competitions currently running which you can enter here. Keep those entries coming in and good luck to all!

AMD Slashes R9 280 & R9 290 Cards

AMD’s R9 290X

AMD have always strived to offer great value for money and their price vs performance ratios have always proven to be a thorn in the side of Nvidia. While Nvidia may be plowing through the industry with a few higher performance cards, AMD are dropping their prices on higher performance products to better compete with Nvidia in their respective price ranges.

While some may say this is AMD trying to keep up, I say “who cares!”, fact is that as a consumer, we’re the ones who win in this graphics card battle and with AMD now dropping the prices of their R9 290 and R9 280 series graphics cards even further, despite the fact they lowered them just last month! It’s never been a better time to buy an AMD card.

The Radeon R9 290X is down from $449 to $399, a far cry from the $549 starting price when the card was launched. The standard Radeon R9 290 is down from its $399 launch price to a very reasonable $299; that’s right, a 290 is now less than $300!

The R9 280X is down to just $270, only $30 short of the 290, but the cards are quite close in terms of performance. One of the best discounts is that the recently launched R9 285 “Tonga” is now down to just $229, putting it within $10 of the GTX 760 price.

There are now a wide range of very high performance cards available for around $300 and with the GeForce GTX 970 available for $329, high-end PC gaming has never been so affordable.

Thank you WCCFTech for providing us with this information.

AMD “Tonga” Features a 384-bit Memory Interface

New information about the Tonga memory interface, surely this is news from weeks ago? You would think so, as we already know that the current AMD Radeon R9 285 graphics cards run via a 256-bit wide memory interface, but the actual silicon is hiding its true potential; the GDDR5 memory interface on Tonga is actually 384-bit wide, not 256.

The Tonga silicon is larger than that of Tahiti and this hidden wider interface goes a long way to explaining why. The chip die of the R9 285 is placed on a package that features just 256 pins, but there is no reason why the hardware can’t be set on a bigger package with more pins, allowing access to the full width of the memory bus.

This means that the next Tonga hardware from AMD will be able to re-use a lot of the same hardware, but at the same time it’ll be able to use 50% more memory bandwidth vs that of the current R9 285 hardware.

thank you PC Watch for providing us with this information.

Images courtesy of PC Watch.

AMD Shoot Down R9 285X Rumour

Ever since the launch of the AMD R9 285 Tonga graphics card, there has been plenty of rumour that AMD would soon be launching another card in the series; the R9 285X. It was long suspected that the new card would feature 2048 SPs, a 384-bit bus and 3GB of GDD5 VRAM.

Unfortunately, a quick question on Twitter was quickly shot down by AMD, so for all it matters now the R9 285X may as well have featured 12GB of GDDR5 and have been powered by fairy dust.

Has the card gone completely or is AMD throwing a curve ball to make people focus on their current range of cards? Who knows, it wouldn’t be the first time a massive corporation has told a white lie to help their sales, but until some more solid information leaks about the next AMD graphics cards, I’m going to assume the 285X is no longer on the roadmap.

Thank you Computerbase for providing us with this information.

Win a Sapphire R9 285 “Tonga” ITX Compact Edition Graphics Card!

It’s competition time again and we are back with yet another awesome prize for you all! The new AMD graphics cards are arriving and we couldn’t think of any better way to mark the occasion than a competition. We’ve joined forces with the good people of Sapphire to give you the chance to win their Sapphire R9 285 2GB GDDR5 ITX COMPACT Edition graphics card, an ideal choice for those building a small form factor PC thanks to its 171mm long PCB; don’t think this is a cut down card though, it still features the same GCN cores as the Dual-X model, with a core clock of 918MHz and memory clock of 1375MHz (5.5GB/s effective).

For more information on R9 285 graphics cards, why not check out our review of the Sapphire Dual-X AMD R9 285 “Tonga” 2GB Graphics Card right here.

If you want a chance of winning this awesome prize, all you have to do is follow the instructions below, it couldn’t be much simpler than that. Good luck!

Rules and regulations:

  • The competition is open globally
  • The competition ends at midnight GMT on the 6th October 2014 and winner(s) will be notified by 10th October 2014
  • In the event of a dispute, eTeknix staff hold the final say and no discussions will be entered into
  • Delivery is not in the hands of eTeknix and can take some time to arrive
  • Full shipping address and phone number is required in your email entry to speed up dispatch of prizes to winners and to prevent multiple entries
  • If the auto-fill email link doesn’t work, email us the information and include the subject “Win a Sapphire R9 285 ITX Compact Edition Graphics Card!”
  • In the event that the prize is unavailable, eTeknix reserve the right to offer an alternative of equal or greater value
  • Winner(s) will be announced on our competition winners page
  • By entering this competition, you adhere to the above rules and regulations

 

First Pictures of AMD Radeon R9 285 Tonga Graphics Cards

The first pictures of three new Tonga GPU graphics cards have been shown and as so often before, the guys over at Videocardz got the first scoop. We’re being presented with a few shots of the Radeon R9 285 series with cards from Sapphire , XFX and HIS Digital.

The new R9 285 will use the Tonge Pro chips, so we can most likely expect Radeon R9 285X to be based on the Tonge XT chip soon. All three new cards are short reference cards, but with custom dual cooler solutions.

They use the XDMA Crossfire so there is no need for bridges (and the pins for them). Connection wise we see the basic AMD setup of 2x DVI, 1x HDMI and 1x DisplayPort.

The actual specifications are still mostly rumours and speculations. We do know that it will have 2GB GDDR5 memory on a 256 bit interface, but besides that we’ll have to wait a little bit more. More should be known very soon as the launch is said to be only 2 weeks away.

The core clock is said to be 918 MHz and the memory clock will be 1375 MHz (5500 MHz effective), and a bandwidth of 176 GB/s. The full Tonga chip itself has the same number of unified cores as the Tahiti, but we don’t know how many the R9 285 will have.

Thank you Videocardz for providing us with this information.

Image courtesy of Videocardz.