BT Promises ‘Ultrafast’ Broadband Speeds in Excess of 300Mbps by 2020

BT’s Chief Executive Gavin Patterson, has promised broadband speeds between 300 and 500Mbps by 2020. Currently, BT is one of the major UK internet service providers and aims to provide super-fast broadband to over 10 million homes. The company also said they will offer a 1Gbps service to the cope with severe network demands from heavy users. This could include 4K streaming, downloading huge games or backing up data on a home server.

2020 seems like an ambitious figures for rural areas which struggle to even access relatively low speeds of 5Mbps. BT is hoping the combination of their G fast technology and Fibre-to-the-Premises (FTTP) connectivity can help revolutionize the service’s internet speeds. Patterson argued speed increases are integral to BT’s market strategy:

“BT would ‘never say no’ to providing faster broadband to communities, promising the company would instead explore innovative funding and technical solutions.” 

Even if BT manages this feat, I’m not entirely convinced it will be able to beat Virgin Media’s network speeds and a great deal depends on network traffic management. It’s unknown if the latest BT network will begin to throttle speeds after so much is downloaded or during peak times. This is becoming a more well-known phenomenon, and customers should access the speeds they pay for all the time.

Thank you The Next Web for providing us with this information.

London to be 5G Enabled by 2020 Promises Boris

Mayor of London Boris Johnson has pledged that London will roll out their 5G network across the city by 2020, something that could give the city a massive economic boost and put it ahead of many other parts of the world in terms of technological infrastructure.

5G is a performance hammer blow compared to 4G, which looks like dial up in comparison, using around 10Gbps (that isn’t a typo) it aims to throw internet at mobile devices faster than ever before, as well as allowing huge numbers of connections that could really change the way we use the internet, especially given that the service will be faster than most wired connections, this could pave the way for more people to cut the cable from their desktop router.

The 5G standard still has a long way to go, as the final details are yet to be defined, but early tests are promising and all this stuff has to start somewhere! Of course it remains to be seen if Boris can uphold this promise, but with David Cameron visiting CeBIT earlier this year to secure the technology for 5G, it certainly looks like we’ll see something big in the next few years.

Thank you Engadget for providing us with this information.

Sony-backed ISP launches fastest internet connection for a home user with 2Gbps speed


So-net Entertainment, Japanese internet service provider backed by Sony, has launched their ‘Nuro’ fiber-based 2Gbps Internet surface, most likely the fastest internet connection in the world for home use. The company uses a service called Gigabit-capable Optics network (GPON) which allows 2.488 Gbps downstream.

The connection started on Monday, and it will provided to homes, apartments and even small businesses in Tokyo and six prefectures. The connection will cost U.S. $51 per month with a 2 year contract, followed by Approx. U.S. $535 as Installation fee which is currently waived off those who apply for the connection via online, which will include optical network unit which is designed to handle high speeds.
The user will be getting an upload speed of 1 Gbps.

The Japanese government has been strongly promoting fiber connections for residences, therefore making them as one of the world leaders for fiber connections. About 25% of the residences in the country use the fiber, which makes it second highest rate in the world to adopt this connection type. UAE starts at #1 spot with over 70%. Most of the population in Tokyo reside in very small apartments, therefore making it easier for the companies to install fiber services. As of now, providing 1Gbps connection is very common.

ONU are used in homes and small business to convert fiber to broadband internet as the speed exceeds the bandwidth throughput of most consumer-grade network adapters, therefore the end users are unlikely to see 2Gbps speeds.

Source: PC World