Raijintek Styx Windowed Micro-ATX Aluminium Chassis Review

by - 4 years ago

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Complete System


Building a system inside the Styx was super easy, as there’s just so much room to play around with in here. I did have to switch out to our R9 285 graphics card from Sapphire, as the PSU I had available was quite large and the R9 270X we often use would conflict with the PSU. This is ok though, as it shows the possibilities and the limitations of this chassis all at the same time. If you’re going for a dual-GPU configuration with longer cards,  get a shorter PSU such as true ATX ones Silverstone make, as this will free up so much more room. Of course, having a single GPU isn’t so bad, as this frees up the full space of the top fan mounts, so fitting water cooling here would now be a lot easier to achieve.

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Cable management is pretty good, with lots of space to keep any excess cables out of the way of cooling fans. There’s a lot of clearance here for a decent size air cooling on the CPU, or as we said before, an AIO water cooler in the top or rear of the chassis.

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Even with the use of a large PSU such as the Dark Power Pro 850W, there’s still a good amount of space above it; this can easily be used to store excess cables.

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All panels back in place and the Styx certainly looks impressive. The window is a little small, but it’s just enough to show off some hardware while hiding the storage bays and power supply.

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Article Index

  1. Introduction
  2. Interior
  3. Complete System
  4. Final Thoughts
  5. View All

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