Corsair H75 120mm All-In-One Water Cooler Review

by - 6 years ago

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A Closer Look


Since this is an all-in-one unit, the radiator, pipes, pump and CPU block are already assembled, meaning you can just bolt it straight into your system with relative ease, making it very beginner friendly. Corsair have even applied some thermal paste, however we’re not fans of the common gunk they put on, so we’ll be cleaning that off and applying our own Gelid thermal paste.

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The fittings for the pipes are your typical compression fittings with a little glue on them, nothing especially fancy, but they should hold up just fine, although obviously they for pumping fluid so handing with a little extra care couldn’t hurt.

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The pump is housed on the back of the CPU block and is powered by a single 3-pin fan cable, nice and easy to install and get it up and running. Corsair even pre-installed the top mounting bracket to the block, which should make installation super easy. The new round design of the pump is rather nice too and features a mixture of plastic and metals that give a nice contrasting design.

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The pipes are really flexible and of a good length, so compatibility is high compared to the often difficult to work with thick pipes of their H80i and H100i range.

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The radiator is quite slim, but the H75 soon becomes a large unit once the fans are installed, adding 50mm to the overall thickness of the unit. A push-pull configuration should shift a lot of heat from the radiator, especially thanks to the use of the two high performance fans that come bundled with the cooler.

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Article Index

  1. Introduction
  2. A Closer Look
  3. Installation
  4. Test System and Methodology
  5. Performance
  6. Final Thoughts
  7. View All

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