Near Miss at Los Angeles Airport Calls for Future Drone Regulation

Drones are on everybody’s wish list this year. If you want them to just enjoy being in charge of your very own Enterprise or just because you are curious about the new technology, you should remember to use them safely. Sadly that seems to be a lesson that was missed by a drone pilot who caused a near miss at Los Angeles International Airport.

The incident involved a drone flying around 200 feet from a plane of a Lufthansa aircraft, a move which has sparked debate for greater control over drones and the authorities abilities to manage, control and restrict drones freedom when it comes to regulated space.

This is not the first time a drone has come close to the plane, with the same thing happening at Heathrow and other airports around the world. The problem with drones is their ability to operate remotely makes tracking down a drone’s operator difficult, an act which the authorities want to become easier.

Some of the proposals include the geofencing of drones sold domestically, meaning that drones would be unable to fly above their legal altitude or the use of collision-avoidance software. With the requirement for drones to now be registered, it is expected that drone capturing equipment such as the SkyWall could offer authorities a way of tracking down and tackling dangerous drone users.

Cooler Master Launched Case Mod World Series 2016

Case modding has become very popular again and it isn’t just something that a few select sponsored people do. A lot of people take it upon themselves to make their existing or new rigs just a little more fly. If you should be among those people, then you might want to pay attention to this as you could end up being one of the people walking away with 30,000 USD in cash and prizes. Cooler Master has launched the Case Mod World Series 2016 which is sponsored by ASUS, Avexir, Dremel, NVIDIA, and OCZ. Those are all some familiar names with some quality products.

The Case Mod World Series is designed to connect modders everywhere and 2016 is the seventh time it is being held where Cooler Master expanded the scope of the series to include local meet and greets, and modding sessions. The participants will be judged in four equally weighted areas that are complexity, design, originality, and overall look. The judgement will be done by the sponsoring companies as well as an international panel of judges: Ermanno Bonandini from Italy, Ronnie Hara from Brazil via Japan, Richard Keirsgieter from The Netherlands, Antony Leather from The UK, Richard Surroz and Brian Farrell from the USA.

“Modding has exploded in recent years and is taking root in every corner of the globe. The Case Mod World Series is about fuelling that growth. It’s about igniting the modding spirit – the maker spirit – on the web and right in your community,” said Michelle Wu, Global Community Manager. “This year, we will be running local events to involve modders everywhere. Together, with the generous support of our sponsors, we hope to enable the modding community the world over. ”

The registration is open now and will run until June the 12th, 2016. You need a Cooler Master Forum account to get going, but it is free and the Case Mod mini-site has all the details in that regard. The Info Hub will keep you updated with posts along the way and as previously mentioned, you can win a lot of prizes.

There are three categories with three places in each. The first place winner in the Tower Mod contest will walk away with $3000 USD in cash, any Cooler Master case of their choice, a V1200 PSU, MasterAir Maker 8 cooler, QuickFire Xti keyboard, Sentinel III mouse and Sirus headset. The motherboard is sponsored by Asus and is a Maximus VIII Formula while the GPU power comes from two GTX 980 Ti cards. Along with that, the first place winner gets OCZ SSD, Avexir Memory and a Dremel 8050 Micro tool. You can also see the full list of prizes for the different categories on the mini-site.

FAA Has Almost 300,000 Drone Owners Registered in the First Month

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) received a lot of hassle when it made its announcement last year when it announced plans to require drone owners to register their craft, both those purchased previously and those which they purchase in future. Even with all this hassle though they’ve seen quite a few drone owners register in the first month.

In a statement, over the first 30 days since the online registration system went online they’ve had nearly 300,000 people register their “small unmanned aircrafts”. If you own a craft between 0.55lbs and 500lbs you are required to register it, with registration required before you are allowed to fly the craft outside.

During the first 30 days, it was free to register, however, there is now a $5 cost for registration. If you purchased your drone before December 21st, 2015, you are required to have registered your drone by the 19th February, with all registrations lasting three years.

With everything from shooting down your neighbours drones and cutting off power in Hollywood, drones have proven to be difficult, with worst case scenarios ending in injuries. Some groups have gone so far as to create anti-drone technology or even an anti-drone police force. With these measures in mind, paying $5 to register your craft isn’t all that bad is it?

Hobbyist Wants FAA’s Drone Registration Legislation Cancelled

After the recent surge of drones, governments are playing catch up to both companies, such as Amazon who are looking at drones for delivering your orders, and those who would use them recreationally. Sadly though when people are given new technology, it doesn’t mean that people won’t get hurt or cause trouble. The Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) has started to combat this by announcing a law that comes into effect this year requiring users to register their drones, but one lawyer is suing the FAA with the hopes that this could annul their registration law.

Under the petition for review, John Taylor asks that the new registration system is cancelled. The new system would see drone users forced to register online, mark their drones with unique ID numbers and possibly face fines if they are not registered by the time of their first flight. The petition was filed on the 24th of December 2015, only four days after the registration system went live. Taylor argues that this new system actually breaches part of the FAA’s own rules, citing section 336 of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012. This section states that the agency may not create new rules or regulations for model aircraft if “the aircraft is flown strictly for hobby or recreational use”.

With some details from the registration set to become publically available, the court could soon face a difficult choice as defining what is recreational use could see some previous issues resurface, these include when drones are used at sporting or public events.

FAA Set Deadline For Drone Registration

For a while now the hot topic for technology being used by the public has been drones. Small devices capable of flight with everything from a camera to a gun attached to them. Recently a drone crashed into a power line in Hollywood, the end result being a power outage for several hours with no way to track the responsible party to a toddler losing an eye to a crashed drone, the concept of controlling this area of technology has been discussed by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) for a while. The FAA has now clarified what the registration will entail and revealed details about the penalties for flying without a permit.

“The Qube is flown in a demonstration (pictured above) in Simi Valley, California, October 19, 2011. The tiny drone with four whirling rotors swoops back and forth about 200 feet above the ground scouring the landscape and capturing crystal-clear video of what lies below. (Gary Friedman/Los Angeles Times/MCT)”

In order to register you will be required to pay a $5 fee, a fee that is being waived if you register in the first 30 days. You must register any drone that weighs between 0.55 and 50 pounds, by the deadline of February 19th, 2016.

The penalty for flying a drone without a license? Civil penalties could be a fine up to $27,500 while criminal penalties could include fees of up to $250,000 and up to three years in jail!

You can start the process now, but you won’t be able to fully register until December 21st. In order to register you must be 13 years old and upon completion will be issued a certificate that will include a unique ID that you must put on your drone.

Eve: Valkyrie Pre-Alpha Registration Ongoing

The world of virtual reality is ever-expanding and what better way than to have a Triple-A game, released by the Sci-Fi experts over at CCP Games, as a launch title for the Oculus Rift? Earlier this year CCP Games announced that the title was beginning registration for Pre-Alpha for Eve Online and Dust 514 players, the latter being somewhat of an unintentional joke as you can make a free Dust 514 account using your PSN account simply by going to dust514.com. That same pre-alpha registration for Valkyrie is still ongoing bearing in mind that the VR title is slated to require a powerhouse PC to be able to play, as mentioned in a previous article here at eTeknix and as stated by CCP Karuck on the Eve Valkyrie forums:

“We haven’t announced any minimum/recommended specs yet, but due to the incredibly heavy demands VR puts on a system (steady 90 fps at very high resolutions, stereo view) I can tell you the requirements will be higher than EVE’s :)” – CCP Karuck

What is known for certain is that the pre-alpha requires, at a minimum, an Oculus Rift DK2, and given the sheer quality of the gameplay video revealed at Eve Fanfest 2015, it’s no wonder that the game has the hardware requirements that it does, being a VR title.

While Eve: Valkyrie does not have an official release date (based on the Oculus Rift’s consumer version release date), you can still register for the pre-alpha if you have an active Eve Online or Dust 514 account, as well as an Oculus Rift DK2, by going to www.evevalkyrie.com/prealpha.